Microsoft Access Self-paced Training Videos

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Microsoft Access - Basic

Introduction to Databases 

Microsoft Access 2013 is a database creation and management program. To understand Access, you must first understand databases.

Introduction to Objects 

Databases in Access are composed of four objects: tables, queries, forms, and reports. Together, these objects allow you to enter, store, analyze, and compile your data however you want.

Getting Started with Access 

Whenever you're learning a new program, it's important to familiarize yourself with the program window and the tools within it. Working with Access is no different. Knowing your way around the Access environment will make learning and using Access much easier.

Working with Tables 

While there are four types of database objects in Access, tables are arguably the most important. Even when you're using forms, queries, and reports, you're still working with tables because that's where all of your data is stored. Tables are at the heart of any database, so it's important to understand how to use them.

Working with Forms 

While you can always enter data directly into database tables, you might find it easier to use forms. Forms ensure you're entering the right data in the right location and format. This can help keep your database accurate and consistent.

Working with Databases 

Each Access database consists of multiple objects that let you interact with data. Databases can include forms for entering data, queries for searching within it, reports for analyzing it, and of course, tables for storing it. Whenever you work with your database, you are working with many of these objects at once. Fortunately, Access makes managing these objects pretty easy.

Microsoft Access - Intermediate

Designing a Simple Query 

The real power of a relational database lies in its ability to quickly retrieve and analyze your data by running a query. Queries allow you to pull information from one or more tables based on a set of search conditions you define. In this lesson, you will learn how to create a simple one-table query.

Designing a Multi-Table Query 

In the previous lesson, you learned how to create a simple query with one table. Most queries you design in Access will likely use multiple tables, allowing you to answer more complex questions. In this lesson, you'll learn how to design and create a multi-table query.

More Query Design Options 

Access offers several options for making your queries work better for you. In addition to modifying your query criteria and joins after you build your queries, you can choose to sort and hide fields in your query results.

Creating Reports 

If you need to share information from your database with someone but don't want that person actually working with your database, consider creating a report. Reports allow you to organize and present your data in a reader-friendly, visually appealing format. Access makes it easy to create and customize a report using data from any query or table in your database.

Advanced Report Options 

Access offers several advanced options for creating and modifying reports. The Report Wizard is a tool that guides you through the process of creating complex reports. Once you've created a report—whether through the Report Wizard or the Report command—you can then format it to make it look exactly how you want.

Sorting and Filtering Records 

Access gives you the ability to work with enormous amounts of data, which means it can be difficult to learn anything about your database just by glancing at it. Sorting and filtering are two tools that let you customize how you organize and view your data, making it more convenient to work with. In this lesson, you'll learn how to sort and filter records.

Microsoft Access - Advanced

Modifying Tables 

After working with your database, you might find that you need to make some changes to the tables that store your data. Access makes it easy to modify your tables to suit your database's needs.

Creating Forms 

Creating forms for your database can make entering data more convenient. When you create a form, you can design it in a way that works with your database and that makes sense to you.

Formatting Forms 

After creating a form, you might want to modify its appearance. Formatting your forms can help make your database look consistent and professional. Some formatting changes can even make your forms easier to use. With the formatting tools in Access, you can customize your forms to look exactly the way you want.

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