SUNY Cobleskill Students Participate in Horse Rescue

March 13, 2012

SUNY Cobleskill students are participating in a horse rescue in partnership with Little Brook Farm of Old Chatham, N.Y. The program is aimed at re-training horses under the guidance of college students to ensure a higher rate of adoption upon the horses’ return to Little Brook Farm at the end of the spring semester.

 

In fall 2011, Equine Business Management class students were charged with modifying the College’s Equine Training class. The idea for the horse rescue originated during a discussion between students Jen Coffin, Christine Tumbarello, Hannah Casella, Crystal Zettl and Associate Professor Ray Whelihan. The students wanted to include a rehabilitation program that would evaluate each horse on a case-by-case basis.

 

After several horse sanctuaries offered proposals, the decision was made to move forward with Little Brook Farm. Located on 55 acres in the hamlet of Old Chatham, Little Brook Farm is a sanctuary for more than 160 animals. Established in 1977, the rescue, rehabilitation and education facility is one of the oldest and largest in the Northeast.

 

Little Brook Farm shipped three horses to SUNY Cobleskill in January: Tiffy, a 4-year-old Arabian Quarter horse cross; Biscuit, an 8-year-old registered Quarter Horse; and Speedy, an 8-year-old retired race horse. Two of the students participating, Megan Steubing and Kate Wood, agreed that there has been improvements in behavior since the horses’ arrival on campus.

 

“When the horses first got here, they were not accustomed to getting so much attention,” said Steubing. “Tiffy was extremely antsy and nervous being indoors. She would also nudge her way out of her stall. Speedy would nip at the students and ignore them. Within the last few weeks, they all have been responding well to us.”

 

SUNY Cobleskill is currently home to 50 horses, 16 of which are free-leased from their owners. In the past, horses used for the Equine Training curriculum were either donated or had been bred on campus. This marks the first time that SUNY Cobleskill has embarked on a partnership in which the College leases horses from a rescue with the intent to help the horses be re-trained for their next chapter.

 

According to Therese Garufi, director of SUNY Cobleskill’s Equine Center, the National Association of Equine Affiliated Academics (NAEAA) oversees a task force that is examining best practices for horse rescues. The NAEAA has studied Little Brook Farm, as well as SUNY Cobleskill, and has asked College representatives to present at the organization’s national meeting, June 24-26, in Bozeman, Mont.

 

“The opportunity to present at the NAEAA national meeting is a tremendous honor for SUNY Cobleskill,” said Garufi. “The platform provides a spotlight on our work this semester, and also offers the opportunity for similar partnerships in the future. Industry officials will recognize SUNY Cobleskill as an institution that educates equine students while caring and rehabilitating horses that need our help.”

 

For more information, contact Therese Garufi at 518-255-5814 or email garufitm@cobleskill.edu.  

SUNY Cobleskill students are participating in a horse rescue in partnership with Little Brook Farm of Old Chatham, N.Y. The program is aimed at re-training horses under the guidance of college students to ensure a higher rate of adoption upon the horses’ return to Little Brook Farm at the end of the spring semester.

 

In fall 2011, Equine Business Management class students were charged with modifying the College’s Equine Training class. The idea for the horse rescue originated during a discussion between students Jen Coffin, Christine Tumbarello, Hannah Casella, Crystal Zettl and Associate Professor Ray Whelihan. The students wanted to include a rehabilitation program that would evaluate each horse on a case-by-case basis.

 

After several horse sanctuaries offered proposals, the decision was made to move forward with Little Brook Farm. Located on 55 acres in the hamlet of Old Chatham, Little Brook Farm is a sanctuary for more than 160 animals. Established in 1977, the rescue, rehabilitation and education facility is one of the oldest and largest in the Northeast.

 

Little Brook Farm shipped three horses to SUNY Cobleskill in January: Tiffy, a 4-year-old Arabian Quarter horse cross; Biscuit, an 8-year-old registered Quarter Horse; and Speedy, an 8-year-old retired race horse. Two of the students participating, Megan Steubing and Kate Wood, agreed that there has been improvements in behavior since the horses’ arrival on campus.

 

“When the horses first got here, they were not accustomed to getting so much attention,” said Steubing. “Tiffy was extremely antsy and nervous being indoors. She would also nudge her way out of her stall. Speedy would nip at the students and ignore them. Within the last few weeks, they all have been responding well to us.”

 

SUNY Cobleskill is currently home to 50 horses, 16 of which are free-leased from their owners. In the past, horses used for the Equine Training curriculum were either donated or had been bred on campus. This marks the first time that SUNY Cobleskill has embarked on a partnership in which the College leases horses from a rescue with the intent to help the horses be re-trained for their next chapter.

 

According to Therese Garufi, director of SUNY Cobleskill’s Equine Center, the National Association of Equine Affiliated Academics (NAEAA) oversees a task force that is examining best practices for horse rescues. The NAEAA has studied Little Brook Farm, as well as SUNY Cobleskill, and has asked College representatives to present at the organization’s national meeting, June 24-26, in Bozeman, Mont.

 

“The opportunity to present at the NAEAA national meeting is a tremendous honor for SUNY Cobleskill,” said Garufi. “The platform provides a spotlight on our work this semester, and also offers the opportunity for similar partnerships in the future. Industry officials will recognize SUNY Cobleskill as an institution that educates equine students while caring and rehabilitating horses that need our help.”

 

For more information, contact Therese Garufi at 518-255-5814 or email garufitm@cobleskill.edu.  

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